CCF Episode Twenty-Four: Christian Liberty According to the 1689 (Part Two)

CredoCovPodcastMaster

In this episode, JD and Billy sit down to discuss Christian Liberty in light of The Baptist Confession. Featuring music from Nora Bayes

MP3 Download | stream:

For further study on the history of alcohol in America and the history of the use of grape juice in communion listen to this sermon delivered by Arden Hodgins.

Subscribe to future podcasts and leave us a review on iTunes: RSS | iTunes  

For further study:

BaptistConfessionLeather1689

 

The Baptist Confession & The Baptist Catechism
edited by James Renihan

We’d love your participation. Contact us with your comments and questions about the confession’s contents:

CCF Episode Twenty-Three: Christian Liberty According to the 1689 (Part One)

CredoCovPodcastMaster

In this episode, Billy and JD sit down to discuss Christian liberty as it is laid out in The Baptist Confession. Featuring music from Josh White and Stephen the Levite.

MP3 Download | stream:

“Modern Christians seem to marginalize the doctrine of Christian liberty. The subject is rarely discussed in any systematic theologies. Even practical books on Christian living often gloss over the topic. For some, the doctrine of Christian liberty is just not that important in relationship to other doctrines of the faith. For others, the doctrine of Christian liberty is too controversial. Consequently, many modern Christians fail to give this doctrine the attention it deserves.” – from Dr. Bob Gonzalez over at It Is Written, read more…

“Many of today’s young evangelicals have happily thrown off the legalistic fundamentalism of their childhood. They’ve come to a greater understanding of God’s abundant grace, and the gospel has liberated them from slavery to guilt and fear. That’s a very good thing. But I submit that recovering the gospel alone isn’t enough to keep legalism at bay. We need a renewed emphasis on the law of God or else legalism will inevitably reemerge. Specifically, we need a clear emphasis on (1) the law as a covenant, and (2) the law as a standard or rule.” – from Tom Hicks over at The Blog (Founders), read more…

Subscribe to future podcasts and leave us a review on iTunes: RSS | iTunes  

The book we mentioned:

BaptistConfessionLeather1689

 

The Baptist Confession & The Baptist Catechism
edited by James Renihan

We’d love your participation. Contact us with your comments and questions about the confession’s contents:

CCF Episode Eighteen: Christianity and the Arts (Part One)


CredoCovPodcastMaster

In this episode, Billy and JD sit down to discuss music as entertainment and how Christians relate to it. Featuring music from Conor Oberst, Pearl Jam, Muddy Waters, Prophets and Outlaws, Stephen the Levite, and Switchfoot.

MP3 Download | stream:

Subscribe to future podcasts and leave us a review on iTunes: RSS | iTunes  

We’d love your participation. Contact us with your comments and questions about the episode:

LBCF of 1677/1689 – Chapter Twenty-One, Of Christian Liberty and Liberty of Conscience

1. The liberty which Christ hath purchased for believers under the gospel, consists in their freedom from the guilt of sin, the condemning wrath of God, the rigour and curse of the law, and in their being delivered from this present evil world, bondage to Satan, and dominion of sin, from the evil of afflictions, the fear and sting of death, the victory of the grave, and ever- lasting damnation: as also in their free access to God, and their yielding obedience unto Him, not out of slavish fear, but a child-like love and willing mind.

All which were common also to believers under the law for the substance of them; but under the New Testament the liberty of Christians is further enlarged, in their freedom from the yoke of a ceremonial law, to which the Jewish church was subjected, and in greater boldness of access to the throne of grace, and in fuller communications of the free Spirit of God, than believers under the law did ordinarily partake of.
( Galatians 3:13; Galatians 1:4; Acts 26:18; Romans 8:3; Romans 8:28; 1 Corinthians 15:54-57; 2 Thessalonians 1:10; Romans 8:15; Luke 1:73-75; 1 John 4:18; Galatians 3:9, 14; John 7:38, 39; Hebrews 10:19-21 )

2. God alone is Lord of the conscience, and hath left it free from the doctrines and commandments of men which are in any thing contrary to his word, or not contained in it. So that to believe such doctrines, or obey such commands out of conscience, is to betray true liberty of conscience; and the requiring of an implicit faith, an absolute and blind obedience, is to destroy liberty of conscience and reason also.
( James 4:12; Romans 14:4; Acts 4:19, 29; 1 Corinthians 7:23; Matthew 15:9; Colossians 2:20, 22, 23; 1 Corinthians 3:5; 2 Corinthians 1:24 )

3. They who upon pretence of Christian liberty do practice any sin, or cherish any sinful lust, as they do thereby pervert the main design of the grace of the gospel to their own destruction, so they wholly destroy the end of Christian liberty, which is, that being delivered out of the hands of all our enemies, we might serve the Lord without fear, in holiness and righeousness before Him, all the days of our lives.
( Romans 6:1, 2; Galatians 5:13; 2 Peter 2:18, 21 )